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This is no place for birds
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File: 1607150127176.jpg (12.42 KB, 325x184, th.jpg)

 No.2


Rothschilds bow to Bogdanoffs
-In contact with aliens
-Possess psychic-like abilities
-Control france with an iron but fair fist
-Own castles & banks globally
-Direct descendants of the ancient royal blood line
-Will bankroll the first cities on Mars (Bogdangrad will be be the first city)
-Own 99% of DNA editing research facilities on Earth
-First designer babies will in all likelihood be Bogdanoff babies
-both brothers said to have 215+ IQ, such intelligence on Earth has only existed deep in Tibetan monasteries & Area 51
-Ancient Indian scriptures tell of two angels who will descend upon Earth and will bring an era of enlightenment and unprecedented technological progress with them
-They own Nanobot R&D labs around the world
-You likely have Bogdabots inside you right now
-The Bogdanoffs are in regular communication with the Archangels Michael and Gabriel, forwarding the word of God to the Orthodox Church. Who do you think set up the meeting between the pope & the Orthodox high command (First meeting between the two organisations in over 1000 years) and arranged the Orthodox leader’s first trip to Antarctica in history literally a few days later to the Bogdanoff bunker in Wilkes land?
-They learned fluent French in under a week
-Nation states entrust their gold reserves with the twins. There’s no gold in Ft. Knox, only Ft. Bogdanoff
-The twins are about 7 decades old, from the space-time reference point of the base human currently accepted by our society
-In reality, they are timeless beings existing in all points of time and space from the big bang to the end of the universe

 No.3


 No.4

>>3


CareNotes
Esophageal Dilation

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Esophageal Dilation

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Nov 16, 2020.

Care Notes

Aftercare Instructions Discharge Care Inpatient Care Precare En Español

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Esophageal dilation is a procedure to widen a narrow part of your esophagus. Your healthcare provider will use a dilator (inflatable balloon or another tool that expands) to make the area wider. He may also do an endoscopy before or during your esophageal dilation. During an endoscopy, your healthcare provider will use a scope to see inside your esophagus.
HOW TO PREPARE:
The week before your procedure:

Write down the correct date, time, and location of your procedure.
Arrange a ride home. Ask a family member or friend to drive you home after your surgery or procedure. Do not drive yourself home.
Ask your healthcare provider if you need to stop using aspirin or any other prescribed or over-the-counter medicine before your procedure or surgery.
Bring your medicine bottles or a list of your medicines when you see your healthcare provider. Tell your provider if you are allergic to any medicine. Tell your provider if you use any herbs, food supplements, or over-the-counter medicine.
You may need blood or urine tests before your procedure. You may also need to have a barium swallow, x-ray, CT scan, or MRI of your esophagus. Talk with your healthcare provider about these or other tests you may need. Write down the date, time, and location for each test.

The night before your procedure:

Ask healthcare providers about directions for eating and drinking.

 No.5

>>4


CareNotes
Esophageal Dilation

Print
Share
Esophageal Dilation

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Nov 16, 2020.

Care Notes

Aftercare Instructions Discharge Care Inpatient Care Precare En Español

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Esophageal dilation is a procedure to widen a narrow part of your esophagus. Your healthcare provider will use a dilator (inflatable balloon or another tool that expands) to make the area wider. He may also do an endoscopy before or during your esophageal dilation. During an endoscopy, your healthcare provider will use a scope to see inside your esophagus.
HOW TO PREPARE:
The week before your procedure:

Write down the correct date, time, and location of your procedure.
Arrange a ride home. Ask a family member or friend to drive you home after your surgery or procedure. Do not drive yourself home.
Ask your healthcare provider if you need to stop using aspirin or any other prescribed or over-the-counter medicine before your procedure or surgery.
Bring your medicine bottles or a list of your medicines when you see your healthcare provider. Tell your provider if you are allergic to any medicine. Tell your provider if you use any herbs, food supplements, or over-the-counter medicine.
You may need blood or urine tests before your procedure. You may also need to have a barium swallow, x-ray, CT scan, or MRI of your esophagus. Talk with your healthcare provider about these or other tests you may need. Write down the date, time, and location for each test.

The night before your procedure:

Ask healthcare providers about directions for eating and drinking.
The day of your procedure:

Ask your healthcare provider before taking any medicine on the day of your procedure. These medicines include insulin, diabetic pills, high blood pressure pills, or heart pills. Bring a list of all the medicines you take, or your pill bottles, with you to the hospital.
You or a close family member will be asked to sign a legal document called a consent form. It gives healthcare providers permission to do the procedure or surgery. It also explains the problems that may happen, and your choices. Make sure all your questions are answered before you sign this form.
Healthcare providers may insert an intravenous tube (IV) into your vein. A vein in the arm is usually chosen. Through the IV tube, you may be given liquids and medicine.
An anesthesiologist will talk to you before your surgery. You may need medicine to keep you asleep or numb an area of your body during surgery. Tell healthcare providers if you or anyone in your family has had a problem with anesthesia in the past.

WHAT WILL HAPPEN:
What will happen:

Your healthcare provider will insert a scope or dilator into your mouth and guide it down to your esophagus. A sample of tissue may be taken to be tested. Your healthcare provider will use a dilator to stretch the narrow part of your esophagus. He may repeat this step 1 or 2 times with larger dilators. He may place a stent or inject steroid medicine into the area to help prevent it from narrowing again.
After your procedure:

You will be taken to a room to rest until you are fully awake. Healthcare providers will monitor you closely for any problems. Do not get out of bed until your healthcare provider says it is okay. When your healthcare provider sees that you are okay, you will be able to go home or be taken to your hospital room.
CONTACT YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IF:

You cannot make it to your procedure.
You have a fever.
You have a cold or the flu.
You have questions or concerns about your procedure.

Seek Care Immediately if

You have more trouble swallowing.
You lose weight without trying.
You have food stuck in your throat that will not move.

 No.6

>>5


The principle symptom of esophageal hemorrhage is sudden bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract, according to Merck Manuals. Merck Manuals reports that the bleeding is often from the distal esopohagus, meaning the part of the esophagus closest to the stomach. According to the Mayo Clinic, blood that normally flows to the liver becomes blocked due to liver cirrhosis 1. The blood then backs up into the smaller and more fragile blood vessels in the esophagus. When the pressure in the vessels of the esophagus becomes too high, blood may leak from the vessels into the esophagus. If the pressure is excessively high, the varices may burst, resulting in a massive influx of blood into the gastrointestinal tract. The Mayo Clinic reports that about 1/3 of people with enlarged blood vessels in the esophagus will experience bleeding 1. Other symptoms of esophageal hemorrhage linked to bleeding are vomiting blood and the presence of blood in the stool. Bleeding in the esophagus is very serious: Merck Manuals reports that death from esophageal hemorrhage may be greater than 50 percent of cases.

 No.7

File: 1607150569049.jpg (6.76 KB, 287x167, th.jpg)


 No.8

File: 1607150641853.jpg (119.93 KB, 660x686, BEAUTIFUL AND INTELLIGENT.JPG)




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